News Release | Environment Florida

​Hurricane Irma and Sewage Spills:

As Florida recovers from Hurricane Irma and the Caribbean braces for yet another devastating storm, a new factsheet by Environment Florida finds that many of the sewer systems in the state’s biggest coastal cities were ill-prepared to handle Irma’s heavy rains and high tides. Over 9 million gallons of wastewater have spilled across Florida in the wake of Hurricane Irma, including raw sewage which contains pathogens that threaten both the environment and public health. 

News Release | Environment Florida

Chemical Contaminants Not Found Outside Jacksonville Superfund Sites

A few days before Hurricane Irma struck Florida, Hurricane Harvey unearthed chemicals and toxic contamination in Texas, adding a further threat to the health and safety of Americans. So the question for Florida has been whether, and to what extent, Irma did the same. To find out, Environment Florida and U.S. PIRG conducted tests in Jacksonville to determine if residents living near Superfund sites were at risk. Those tests do not show chemical spikes.

News Release | Environment Florida

Lessons From Harvey: Mapping Out Toxic Sites In Hurricane Irma’s Path

A map of potential toxic sites and a statement by Kara Cook-Schultz, Toxics Program Director for U.S. PIRG (Public Interest Research Group) Education Fund and Florida PIRG Education Fund, and Jennifer Rubiello, Environment Florida Research & Policy Center.

News Release | Environment Florida

City of Orlando Passes 100% Clean Energy Resolution

The Orlando City Commission unanimously passed a resolution this week to generate 100 percent of the electricity consumed within the city from clean, renewable sources by 2050.

News Release | Environment America

House Bill Would Shift America Entirely to Clean Energy By 2050

Today, Representatives Jared Polis (CO), Jared Huffman (CA), Raul Grijalva (AZ) and Pramila Jayapal (WA) introduced a bill to phase out fossil fuels and completely replace them with clean, renewable energy by 2050.

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