News Release | Environment Florida

New Climate Science Report Warns of Increased Risk, Need for Action

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change officially released its latest report on global warming yesterday. The report adds to the ever-growing body of evidence that action on to limit carbon pollution is urgently needed – and without it, risk to future generations will only continue to grow.

News Release | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

Clean Energy Is Cutting Carbon, But Florida Lags

With South Florida “ground zero” when it comes to some of the worst impacts of global warming, from rising seas to disappearing Everglades, Congressional delegates Frankel and Murphy, along with local elected leaders, joined Environment Florida Research & Policy Center today to call for more state and national action in the fight to cut carbon pollution. Speakers gathered at Florida Atlantic University’s Pine Jog Environmental Education Center to release a new report, Moving America Forward, that highlight’s the impact of the Clean Cars Program and other measures that have helped Florida reduce its emissions.

Report | Enviornment Florida Research & Policy Center

Moving America Forward

News Release | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

Florida Ranks 3rd for Global Warming Pollution from Power Plants

TAMPA, FL– On the heels of increasingly severe weather events, a new report from Environment Florida Research & Policy Center finds that Florida ranks 3rd in the country for most carbon pollution from power plants, the state’s largest single source of global warming pollution. Scientists predict that extreme weather events will become more frequent and severe for future generations without action to reduce the carbon pollution fueling the problem.

Report | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

America's Dirtiest Power Plants

Global warming is one of the most profound threats of our time, and we’re already starting to feel the impacts – especially when it comes to extreme weather. From Hurricane Sandy to devastating droughts and deadly heat waves, extreme weather events threaten our safety, our health and our environment, and scientists predict things will only get worse for future generations unless we cut the dangerous global warming pollution that is fueling the problem. Power plants are the largest source of global warming pollution in the United States, responsible for 41 percent of the nation’s production of carbon dioxide pollution, the leading greenhouse gas driving global warming.

Report | Environment Florida

Lighting The Way

Solar energy is on the rise. America has more than three times as much solar photovoltaic capacity today as in 2010, and more than 10 times as much as in 2007. In the first three months of 2013, solar power accounted for nearly half of the new electricity generating capacity in the United States. The price of solar energy is falling rapidly, and each year tens of thousands of additional Americans begin to reap the benefits of clean energy from the sun, generated right on the rooftops of their homes or places of business.

News Release | Environment Florida

Sunshine State Lags Behind Leading Solar States, Ranking 16th in Solar Per Capita Gainesville is a Bright Spot

Tallahassee, Fla. – Environment Florida Research & Policy Center released Lighting the Way: What We Can Learn from America’s Top 12 Solar States, a new report highlighting a solar energy boom across the country. The report outlines the 12 states with the most solar per capita.  Despite being the Sunshine State, Florida ranks only 16th in the nation for per capita solar installed through 2012. Last year, solar capacity in Florida grew by 13% bringing it to a total of 186 megawatts through the end of 2012. 

Report | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

The Way Forward on Global Warming

Humanity is running out of time to stop the most dangerous impacts of global warming. Signs of global warming are appearing around the world—including in the United States—and the latest science suggests that future impacts are likely to occur sooner and be more severe than previously thought.

The failure of the international community to take strong action to limit global warming pollution and the death of comprehensive energy and climate legislation in the U.S. Congress in 2010 have been major setbacks in the battle to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. But there is still hope—there are plenty of opportunities to reduce emissions of global warming pollution in the United States, while restoring momentum in the fight against global warming.

By adopting a suite of clean energy policies at the local, state and federal levels, the United States could curb emissions of carbon dioxide from energy use by as much as 20 percent by 2020 and 34 percent by 2030 (compared with 2005 levels). These savings represent a significant down payment on the emission reductions America must achieve to prevent the worst impacts of global warming, and put the nation on a path to achieve further emission reductions in the years ahead.

Report | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

Building a Better America

We can save money and help solve global warming by reducing the amount of energy we use, including in the buildings where we live and work every day. More than 40 percent of our energy — and 10 percent of all the energy used in the world — goes toward powering America’s buildings. But today’s high-efficiency homes and buildings prove that we have the technology and skills to drastically improve the efficiency of our buildings while simultaneously improving their comfort and affordability.

If we apply those lessons to all buildings, we can reduce energy use in our homes and workplaces by a quarter, lowering global warming pollution from buildings 30 percent by 2030.

News Release | Environment Florida Research & Policy Center

Energy Efficient Buildings Would Reduce Global Warming Pollution, Save Florida Families $590 Annually

Florida families could save $590 every year on their electricity bills by 2030 if the government invests in the energy efficiency of our buildings today, according to a new report by Environment Florida. Saving energy in our buildings would also help Florida’s fight against global warming, reducing global warming pollution from buildings by 35 percent—the equivalent of taking 12.6 million cars off the road or shutting down 15 coal-fired power plants.

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